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18-FDG EXTERNAL RADIATION DOSE RATES IN DIFFERENT BODY REGIONS OF PET-MRI PATIENTS
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 Title & Authors
18-FDG EXTERNAL RADIATION DOSE RATES IN DIFFERENT BODY REGIONS OF PET-MRI PATIENTS
Han, Eunok; Kim, Ssangtae;
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 Abstract
To determine the factors affecting the external radiation dose rates of patients undergoing PET-MRI examinations and to assess the trends of these differences, we measured the changes in the dose rates of -FDG during a set period of time for each body region. Consistent with theoretical predictions, the dose rate decreased over time in patients undergoing PET-MRI examinations. Furthermore, immediately after the -FDG injection, the dose rate in the chest region was the highest, followed by the abdominal region, the head region, and the foot region. The dose rate decreased drastically as time passed, by 2.47-fold, from ( min) at the time point immediately after the -FDG injection to ( min) after the examination. In the foot region, there were no significant changes over time, from ( min) at the time point immediately after the -FDG injection, to ( min) after the examination. The dose rate is dependent on the individual characteristics of the patient, and differed depending on the body region and time point. However, the dose rates were higher in patients who had a lower body weight, shorter stature, fewer urinations, lower fluid intake, and history of diabetes mellitus. To decrease radiation exposure, it is difficult or impossible to change factors inherent to the patient, such as sex, age, height, body weight, obesity, and history of diabetes mellitus. However, factors which can be changed, such as the -FDG dose, fasting time, fluid intake, number of urinations, and contrast agent dose can be controlled to minimize the external radiation exposure of the patient.
 Keywords
-FDG;PET-MRI;External Radiation Dose Rate;Influence Factor;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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