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Changing Trends and Classification of Composition Styles of Treasure Patterns on Textiles in Joseon Period
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 Title & Authors
Changing Trends and Classification of Composition Styles of Treasure Patterns on Textiles in Joseon Period
Cho, Hyo-Sook; Lee, Eunjin;
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 Abstract
Treasures patterns are simplified designs of vessels used in everyday life, which were symbols of luck. Treasures patterns on textiles are largely assorted into four groups: eight auspicious patterns of Buddhism, eight immortal patterns of Taoism, seven treasures patterns of King Chakravarti in the Buddhist Scriptures and normal treasures patterns. Among them normal treasures patterns are most commonly used. Records in the Joseon documents show these patterns as being composed of seven treasures patterns or eight treasures patterns. But observation of the actual relics show that these patterns ranged from four to ten patterns. Korean traditional textiles treasures patterns began to appear in Korea on the relics of the last of Goryeo period. They were used as sub-patterns among main patterns of dynamically rising cloud patterns with five heads. Treasures patterns in the early Joseon period were commonly used as sub-patterns, and cloud and treasures pattern were prime examples of this. In the 16th century, lotus vine pattern, small flower vine pattern, or small flower pattern were often used as main patterns and treasures patterns were regularly used as sub-patterns. The robe of the Great Monk of Seo San was unique, in that both main and sub patterns consisted of the treasures patterns. From the 17th century, treasures patterns began to be used as main patterns. For example, a relic with eight alternatively arranged treasures patterns were found. Though there were still some cases where the patterns were used as sub-patterns, they begin to appear bigger than the previous period and became similar to main patterns in size. In the 18th and 19th centuries, there were various cases where treasures patterns were combined with flowers, fruits, animals, and letter patterns and used as main patterns. And there are many different methods of representing and developing the patterns.
 Keywords
the eight buddhist symbols pattern;the eight good luck symbols pattern;the eight taoist symbols pattern;the seven good luck Symbols pattern;the treasure patterns;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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