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A study on the transition of the Hungarian men's costume
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 Title & Authors
A study on the transition of the Hungarian men's costume
Cho, Hyunjin;
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 Abstract
This paper examines the transition of the Hungarian men's costume. Transition of the Hungarian men's costume can be divided into pre-eighteenth century, eighteenth century, and since the nineteenth century. Hungarian costume was derived from the Magyar who settled in Hungary in the ninth century. Hungry had begun to accept Western culture in the tenth century, so when the prototype of Hungarian costume was completed, it consisted of Dolman, Mente, pants, and boots combining traditional Magyar style with Western European style. In particular, Dolman shows the uniqueness of the Hungarian men's costume; it has a high, stand-up collar in the back center, closes on the left, has a right front plate with a diagonal cut at the waist, and a wide front closure. In the eighteenth century, Hungarian men's costumes played an important role in displaying national pride while living under the oppression of the Habsburg Empire. In particular, Dolman was worn as a uniform at the battle of independence (1703~1710). This dress of male courtiers became the distinctive style of the eighteenth century and then became the basic style of men's costumes. Since the nineteenth century, Hungarian men's costumes have acted as an means to promote the national consciousness of Hungary through the Citizen Revolution (1848), the War of Independence (1849), and the formation of the Dual Empire (1867). Looking at evolution of the Hungarian men's dress style, it reveals that resistance and struggles against other nations, a history of aggression, and living under oppressed are factors that impact on important clothing transitions.
 Keywords
Hungarian men's costume;Dolman;Mente;Magyar;Habsburg Empire;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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