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Shear Strength of Concrete Members without Transverse Steel
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 Title & Authors
Shear Strength of Concrete Members without Transverse Steel
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 Abstract
The truss analogy for the analysis of beam-columns subjected of shear and flexure is limited by the contribution of transverse and longitudinal steel and diagonal concrete compression struts. However, it should be noted that even though the behavior of reinforced concrete beam-columns after cracking can be modeled with the truss analogy, they are not perfect trusses but still structural elements with a measure of continuity provided by a diagonal tension field. The mere notion of compression field denotes that there should be some tension field coexisting perpendicularly to it. The compression field is assumed to form parallel to the crack plane that forms under combined flexure and shear. Therefore, the concrete tension field may be defined as a mechanism existing across the crack and resisting crack opening. In this paper, the effect of concrete tensile properties on the shear strength and stiffness of reinforced concrete beam-columns is discussed using the Gauss two-point truss model. The theoretical predictions are validated against the experimental observations. Although the agreement is not perfect, the comparison shows the correct trend in degradation as the inelasticity increases.
 Keywords
concrete in tension;crack angle;flexure-shear interaction;shear;tension model;truss model and unreinforced concrete;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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