JOURNAL BROWSE
Search
Advanced SearchSearch Tips
LEE SANG GAK TELESCOPE (LSGT): A REMOTELY OPERATED ROBOTIC TELESCOPE FOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH AT SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
facebook(new window)  Pirnt(new window) E-mail(new window) Excel Download
 Title & Authors
LEE SANG GAK TELESCOPE (LSGT): A REMOTELY OPERATED ROBOTIC TELESCOPE FOR EDUCATION AND RESEARCH AT SEOUL NATIONAL UNIVERSITY
IM, MYUNGSHIN; CHOI, CHANGSU; KIM, KIHYUN;
  PDF(new window)
 Abstract
We introduce the Lee Sang Gak Telescope (LSGT), a remotely operated, robotic 0.43-meter telescope. The telescope was installed at the Siding Spring Observatory, Australia, in 2014 October, to secure regular and exclusive access to the dark sky and excellent atmospheric conditions in the southern hemisphere from the Seoul National University (SNU) campus. Here, we describe the LSGT system and its performance, present example images from early observations, and discuss a future plan to upgrade the system. The use of the telescope includes (i) long-term monitoring observations of nearby galaxies, active galactic nuclei, and supernovae; (ii) rapid follow-up observations of transients such as gamma-ray bursts and gravitational wave sources; and (iii) observations for educational activities at SNU. Based on observations performed so far, we find that the telescope is capable of providing images to a depth of R = 21:5 mag (point source detection) at 5-σ with 15 min total integration time under good observing conditions.
 Keywords
telescopes;instrumentation: detectors;methods: observational;technique: photometric;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
THE VERY EARLY LIGHT CURVE OF SN 2015F IN NGC 2442: A POSSIBLE DETECTION OF SHOCK-HEATED COOLING EMISSION AND CONSTRAINTS ON SN Ia PROGENITOR SYSTEM, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, 2015, 221, 1, 22  crossref(new windwow)
2.
A Wide-Field Camera and Fully Remote Operations at the Wyoming Infrared Observatory, Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, 2016, 128, 969, 115003  crossref(new windwow)
 References
1.
Aceituno, J., Sanchez, S. F., Aceituno, F. J., et al. 2011, An All-Sky Transmission Monitor: ASTMON, PASP, 123, 1076 crossref(new window)

2.
Choi, C., & Im, M. 2014, SNUO Observation of GRB 130427A, The Tenth Pacic Rim Conference on Stellar Astrophysics, ASP Conference Series, 482, 203

3.
Im, M., Choi, C., Yoon, S.-C., et al. 2015, The Very Early Light Curve of SN 2015F in NGC 2442: A Possible Detection of Shock-Heated Cooling Emission and Constraints on SN Ia Progenitor System, ApJS, submitted

4.
Im, M., Ko, J., Cho, Y., Choi, C., Jeon, Y., Lee, I., & Ibrahimov, M. 2010, Seoul National University 4K×4K Camera (SNUCAM) for Maidanak Observatory, JKAS, 43, 75

5.
Kim, E., Park, W.-K., Jeong, H., et al. 2011, Auto-Guiding System for CQUEAN (Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse), JKAS, 44, 115

6.
Lee, J., Choe, S.-U., Jung, J.-H., & Woo, H.-G. 2009, Astronomical Observation Environment Study focusing on Night Sky Brightness Variation under Light Pollution, JKESS, 30, 344

7.
Leinert, C., & Mattila, K. 1998, Natural Optical Sky Background, Preserving the Astronomical Windows, ASP Conference Series, 139, 17

8.
Lim, J., Chang, S., Pak, S., Kim, Y., Park, W.-K., & Im, M. 2013, Focal Reducer for CQUEAN (Camera for QUasars in EArly uNiverse), JKAS, 46, 161

9.
Park, W.-K., Pak, S., Im, M., et al. 2012, Camera for Quasars in Early Universe (CQUEAN), PASP, 124, 839 crossref(new window)

10.
Patat, F. 2003, UBVRI Night Sky Brightness During Sunspot Maximum at ESO-Paranal, A&A, 400, 1183

11.
Pedani, M. 2009, Sky Surface Brightness at Mount Graham: UBVRI Science Observations with the Large Binocular Telescope, PASP, 121, 778 crossref(new window)