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Effect of Different Cations on Pidan Composition and Flavor in Comparison to the Fresh Duck Egg
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 Title & Authors
Effect of Different Cations on Pidan Composition and Flavor in Comparison to the Fresh Duck Egg
Ganasen, Palanivel; Benjakul, Soottawat; Hideki, Kishimura;
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 Abstract
The effects of different cations on its composition and flavor characteristics of pidan white and yolk produced with duck egg in comparison to its fresh egg were investigated. Mineral content such as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium were significantly increased in pidan yolk irrespective of its cations in pickle solution in comparison to the fresh yolk (P<0.05). It confirmed the migration of minerals from the pickling solution to the egg. However, calcium and magnesium was found lower in 0.2% treated pidan. Less pidan flavor compounds were generated in pidan white produced with the aid of 0.2% . It confirmed that binding of lead prevent the maillard reaction in the pidan treated with . Benzaldehyde, ketones, alcohol and acid found in the pidan white treated with 0.2% reveals that volatiles are generated most likely from maillard reaction. However, pidan yolk of both 0.2% and 0.2% showed higher generation of volatiles more likely from yolk lipids. Butanal, pentanal, hexanal, and heptanal are of those aldehydes found in 0.2% treated pidan yolk whereas hexanal is the only aldehyde detected in 0.2% treated pidan yolk. Thus, cations in the pickling solution affect the flavor characteristics of pidan white and yolk.
 Keywords
pidan;flavor;volatiles;minerals;pidan yolk;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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