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An Experimental Study on the Ultimate Strength of Aluminum Alloy Single Shear Bolted Angle Connections
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 Title & Authors
An Experimental Study on the Ultimate Strength of Aluminum Alloy Single Shear Bolted Angle Connections
Kim, Tae-Soo;
 
 Abstract
Angle-section members are widely used as tension members bolted with the main structures of building. Current design specifications for tensile net-section fracture capacity present strength reduction factor to account for the strength reduction effects by shear-lag and bending moment induced from load eccentricity. In this paper, reduction factors used in bolted angle connections were investigated and net-section efficiency were compared according to the change of plate thickness, end distance and bolt arrangement. Most of specimens failed by tensile net-section fracture accompanied by curling (out-of-plane deformation) at outstanding leg exception to some specimens with short end distance and (single) bolt arrangement. Curling changed the fracture mode and reduced the strength in bolted angle connection. Curling deformation got larger with the increase of end distance in the parallel to loading direction and. Also, net-section efficiency has tended to get higher according to the increase of bolt number and plate thickness. Test strengths were compared with those by strength equations of current design codes and existing study results.
 Keywords
Aluminum alloys;Bolted angle connection;Ultimate strength;Curling;Strength reduction factor;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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