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A Study on the Formative Period and Form of the Double Corridor in Ancient East Asian Buddhist Temples
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 Title & Authors
A Study on the Formative Period and Form of the Double Corridor in Ancient East Asian Buddhist Temples
Hyun, Seung-Wook;
 
 Abstract
The corridor of ancient buddhist temples is important component part to surround main structures such as a Buddhist Hall, a Pagoda, and so forth to divide the inner space of temple. Regarding the form of the corridor, the single corridor (one bay wide) was most common, but the double corridor (two bays wide) was sometimes found from some large scaled temples. In this study, the double corridor of buddhist temples which the results of the study were insufficient up to now was researched. The formative period and form of the double corridor in ancient buddhist temples were investigated by focusing on the materials of excavation and painting for Korean, Chinese, and Japanese buddhist temples. The conclusion of the study was as follows: First, the formative period of the double corridor in ancient buddhist temples in East Asia was verified as approximately between the mid seventh century and the mid eighth century. Second, the double corridor was closely related with the enlargement of buddhist temples and the multi courtyard composition for them. Finally, the double corridor was classified as three forms depending on the position of wall, and the form that the wall is built at the center line of column was the most usual one among the three forms.
 Keywords
Double Corridor;Corridor;Ancient Buddhist Temple;Multi-Courtyard Temple;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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