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A Study on the Meaning of Building Composition of Nine Zen School Temples from late Silla to early Goryeo Era
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 Title & Authors
A Study on the Meaning of Building Composition of Nine Zen School Temples from late Silla to early Goryeo Era
Han, Ji-Man;
 
 Abstract
The purpose of this study is to clarify the meaning on architectural history of nine Zen school's building composition, which established from late Silla to early Goryeo era of century in Korea, through a comparative study with early Chinese Zen Buddhist temple. The building composition in central area of early Chinese Zen Buddhist temples established in early century, was basically not much different from that of the existing temples. Such building composition form of early Chinese Zen Buddhist temples was introduced to the Silla by Zen priest, and influenced on nine Zen school's building composition which established by them. Therefore the sites of nine Zen school temples remaining in Korea, can be said to have an important meaning in the history of East Asian Buddhism architecture, Since the influence of early Chinese Zen temple is inherent in it.
 Keywords
East Asia;Zen Buddhist temple;time from late Silla to early Goryeo era;nine Zen school;building composition;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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