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A numerical analysis on the extinction of hydrogen-oxygen diffusion flames at high pressure
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 Title & Authors
A numerical analysis on the extinction of hydrogen-oxygen diffusion flames at high pressure
Son, Chae-Hun; Kim, Jong-Su; Jeong, Seok-Ho; Lee, Su-Ryong;
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 Abstract
Extinction characteristics of pure hydrogen-oxygen diffusion flames, at high pressures in the neighborhood of the critical pressure of oxygen, is numerically studied by employing counterflow diffusion flame as a model flame let in turbulent flames in rocket engines. The numerical results show that extinction strain rate increases almost linearly with pressure up to 100 atm, which can be explained by comparison of the chain-branching-reaction rate with the recombination-reaction rate. Since contributions of the chain-branching reactions, two-body reactions, are found to be much greater than those of the recombination reactions, three-body reactions, extinction is controlled by two-body reactions, thereby resulting in the linearity of extinction strain rate to pressure. Therefore, it is found that the chemical kinetic behaviors don't change up to 100 atm. Consideration of the pressure fall-off reactions shows a slight increase in extinction strain rate, but does not modify its linearity to pressure. The reduced kinetic mechanisms, which were verified at low pressures, are found to be still valid at high pressures and show good qualitative agreement in prediction of extinction strain rates. Effect of real gas is negligible on chemical kinetic behaviors of the flames.
 Keywords
Hydrogen-Oxygen Diffusion Flams;Extinction;Strain Rate;Chain Branching/Recombination Reaction;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
1.
천연가스 예혼합화염의 연소특성 및 축소반응메커니즘에 관한 연구,이수룡;김홍집;정석호;

한국자동차공학회논문집, 1998. vol.6. 4, pp.166-177
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