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A Research on the Characteristics of Japan's Video Games Focused on the Connection of Japan's Traditional Play Culture
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 Title & Authors
A Research on the Characteristics of Japan's Video Games Focused on the Connection of Japan's Traditional Play Culture
Oh, Dong-Il;
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 Abstract
This research discusses the unique characteristics of Japanese video game from the cultural viewpoint of Japan's traditional play. It starts with the possibility that Japanese video game can share the characteristics of traditional Japanese play. Accordingly, this research first considers the connection between play and video game for a theoretical background, by comparing their theoretical definitions and characteristics. Particularly, it shows the research direction from the viewpoint of Ludology that approaches video game from the aspect of play. Second, the characteristics of traditional Japanese play are examined in connection with Japan's inherent animism culture. Based on such characteristics, the common characteristics and backgrounds of Japanese video game and traditional Japanese play are discussed from the 'spatial' aspect of game, from the 'identity' aspect of game characters, and from the 'motive' behind playing game.
 Keywords
Japanese Video Game;Japanese traditional Play and Culture;Animism;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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