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Ambivalent Reading on the Story of the Colonialism in The Piano
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 Title & Authors
Ambivalent Reading on the Story of the Colonialism in The Piano
Park, Seung Hyun; Nam, Jae Il;
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 Abstract
The Piano, directed by Jane Campion in 1993, became a sensational movie with a special theme focusing on gender and sexual identity, when it won Palme d'Or in the Cannes Film Festival at the same year. Most of the critics discuss the representation of Victorian sexual repression in the colonial setting. But the critical acclaim tends to view the existence of the Maori people and the colonial setting as the backdrop of the narrative, although this colonial background is constructed as a medium to accelerate the release of the repressed passion. Regarding the race issue as a compelling discourse that gets left out of "feminist" accounts, this paper analyzes The Piano, focusing on both how the story of colonialism is constituted in the film and how the film represents ambivalent images of the Maori people, the native of New Zealand.
 Keywords
The Piano;Jane Campion;Maori;race representation;gender identity;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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