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Plasma Amino Acid Status of Crossbred Heifers Fed Two Levels of Dietary Protein and its Relationship to Puberty Onset
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 Title & Authors
Plasma Amino Acid Status of Crossbred Heifers Fed Two Levels of Dietary Protein and its Relationship to Puberty Onset
Swain, R.K.; Kaur, Harjit;
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 Abstract
Twelve prepubertal Karan Fries heifers (15 months, ) were divided into two equal groups. Group 1 was fed as per NRC requirements and group 2 was fed 20% more protein than group 1 heifers. The experimental feeding was continued until the onset of puberty in both the groups. Blood samples were collected at fortnightly intervals and analyzed for amino acids using HPLC. Group 1 and 2 heifers required and days of experimental feeding to exhibit first estrus resulting in total age at puberty as and days in the two groups respectively. The concentration of total amino acids averaged 4.40 and 4.89 mmol/l and those of non-essential amino acids (NEAA) was 2.32 and 2.49 mmol/l in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The concentration of plasma essential amino acids i.e. histidine, threonine, valine, methionine, isoleucine, leucine and phenylalanine were higher (p<0.01) in group 2 than group 1. Plasma concentration of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) was significantly higher in group 2 (1.28 mmol/l) than in group 1 (1.12 mmol/l). Increased levels of leucine, isoleucine and valine are implicated in increased follicular growth and development in prepubertal heifers and resulted in a 26 day earlier attainment of puberty by 26 days in an experimental period of six months in group 2 heifers. Increased concentrations of aspartate and tyrosine in group 2 heifers might be associated with the release of GnRH from the hypothalamus influencing LH release from anterior pituitary in such animals. It is therefore evident that increased availability of certain amino acids in heifers fed high protein diet might have led to early onset of puberty.
 Keywords
Amino acids;Protein;Puberty;Heifers;Tyrosine;Aspartate;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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