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Corn Particle Size Affects Nutritional Value of Simple and Complex Diets for Nursery Pigs and Broiler Chicks
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 Title & Authors
Corn Particle Size Affects Nutritional Value of Simple and Complex Diets for Nursery Pigs and Broiler Chicks
Kim, I.H.; Hancock, J.D.; Hong, J.W.; Cabrera, M.R.; Hines, R.H.; Behnke, K.C.;
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 Abstract
Two experiments were conducted to determine the effects of reducing particle size of corn from 1,000 to 500 in simple and complex diets for nursery pigs and broiler chicks. In Exp 1., 192 nursery pigs were used in a 24 d growth assay. Treatments were: 1) 1,000 corn in a simple diet; 2) 500 corn in a simple diet; 3) 1,000 corn in a complex diet; and 4) 500 corn in a complex diet. Overall, pigs fed complex diets had 9% greater ADG (p<0.005) and 5% greater gain/feed (p<0.01) compared to pigs fed simple diets. Also, pigs fed the 500 treatments had 3% better overall gain/feed than those fed the 1,000 treatments (p<0.007). At d 9, apparent digestibilities of DM, N and GE were greater for complex diets and diets with smaller particle size (p<0.02). At d 23, there were no differences in nutrient digestibility resulting from diet complexity, but pigs fed diets with corn ground to 500 had greater digestibility of DM (p<0.02) and GE (p<0.003) than pigs fed diets with corn ground to 1,000 . A second experiment was designed to determine if four days old broiler chicks were an acceptable model for predicting the effects of feed processing procedures on nursery pigs. Chicks fed complex diets had 3% greater gain/feed than chicks fed simple diets (p<0.001). Rate of gain and feed intake were improved by 3 and 2%, respectively, for chicks fed crumbled diets (p<0.03). However, there were several significant interactions among the main effects. For instance, crumbling did not affect gain/feed in chicks fed complex diets, but rate of gain and feed intake were increased by 7 and 6%, respectively, when simple diets were crumbled (diet complexitydiet form, p<0.001). Also, gain/feed of chicks was improved by 3% when particle size was reduced in meal diets, but not affected in chicks fed crumbles (diet formparticle size, p<0.005). Thus, our data suggested that reduction of particle size of corn was important for simple and complex diets and that a complex diet with 1,000 corn gave no better performance than a simple diet with 500 corn.
 Keywords
Nursery Pig;Broiler;Diet Complexity;Particle Size;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Effects of Particle Size of Barley on Intestinal Morphology, Growth Performance and Nutrient Digestibility in Pigs,;;

Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences, 2007. vol.20. 11, pp.1738-1745 crossref(new window)
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