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Effect of Brewery Waste Replacement of Concentrate on the Performance of Local and Crossbred Growing Muscovy Ducks
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 Title & Authors
Effect of Brewery Waste Replacement of Concentrate on the Performance of Local and Crossbred Growing Muscovy Ducks
Dong, Nguyen Thi Kim; Ogle, R.Brian;
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 Abstract
Two experiments were carried out to evaluate the effects of brewery waste (BW) replacement of concentrate (C) in growing duck diets. In Exp. 1, which was carried out on-station, 300 ducklings were allocated in a factorial experiment: Two breeds (local Muscovy and crosses of French and local Muscovy) levels of C and with BW offered ad libitum. Concentrate only ad libitum as the control diet (C100), and levels of 75% (C75), 50% (C50), 25% (C25) and 0% (C0) of the amount of the control diet consumed, and with BW ad libitum. In Exp. 2, 200 ducklings were allocated in a factorial experiment on five smallholdings: two breeds (local and crossbred Muscovy ducks) diets (the C100 and C50 diets from Exp.1). In Exp.1 total dry matter (DM), BW, crude fiber (CF) and crude protein (CP) intakes were highest on the C0 diet and ME and lysine intakes lowest (p<0.001). Daily live weight gains were higher for the crossbred ducks than for the local Muscovies (p<0.05) and were highest for treatments C100 and C50, and lowest for treatment C0 (p<0.05). Weights of breast muscle, liver and abdominal fat were significantly higher for the crossbred ducks. Breast and thigh muscle and abdominal fat weights were significantly higher for the C100, C75 and C50 diets, while gizzard weights were highest for the C25 and C0 treatments. Net profits were higher for the crosses, and for treatments C50 and C25. In Exp. 2 total DM, CF and CP intakes were significantly higher for the C50 diet, and ME intakes lower (p<0.001). Daily gains of the crosses were significantly higher than those of the local Muscovy ducks, and were similar for the C100 and C50 diets. The highest net profits were from the crosses and ducks fed the C50 diet. It was concluded that BW can replace 50% of the concentrate in growing Muscovy duck diets without reducing daily live weight gains and with improved economic benefits.
 Keywords
Brewery Waste;Growth Rate;Muscovy Ducks;Feed Intake;Profits;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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