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The Plasma Level of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) in Relation to Mammary Circulation and Milk Yield in Two Different Types of Crossbred Holstein Cattle
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 Title & Authors
The Plasma Level of Insulin-like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) in Relation to Mammary Circulation and Milk Yield in Two Different Types of Crossbred Holstein Cattle
Chaiyabutr, N.; Komolvanich, S.; Thammacharoen, S.; Chanpongsang, S.;
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 Abstract
The objective of the present study was to determine the plasma level of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) in relation to mammary blood flow and milk yield including biological variables of relevance to milk synthesis in two different types of crossbred Holstein cattle at 3 different stages of lactation. Eight heifers were 87.5% HF and eight 50% HF animals were selected for the experiments. The three stages of lactation tested were: early lactation (30 days postpartum), mid-lactation (120 days postpartum) and late lactation (210 days postpartum). Animals in each group were fed a concentrate and rice straw treated with 5% urea as the source of roughage throughout the experiments. In early lactation, mammary blood flow and milk yield of 87.5% HF animals were significantly higher than those of 50% HF animals. In mid- and late lactation, both mammary blood flow and milk yield showed a proportional decrease from the early lactating period of 87.5% HF animals. The trends for persistency were observed in 50% HF animals as for udder blood flow and milk yield throughout the experimental periods. The plasma glucose level of the 50% HF animals was significantly higher than those of 87.5% HF animals in both early and mid-lactation. The concentrations of arterial plasma free fatty acids () were higher in 50% HF animals as compared with 87.5% HF animals in all periods of study. In early lactation, the concentration of plasma growth hormone (GH) of 87.5% HF animals was higher than those of the 50% HF animals, thereafter the mean level of plasma growth hormone declined in both mid- and late lactation. The concentration of plasma IGF-I of 50% HF animals was significantly higher than those of 87.5% HF animals in all stages of lactation. There were no differences among stages of lactation for the levels of plasma IGF-I, insulin and growth hormone in 50% HF animals. In 87.5% HF animals, the plasma levels of both IGF-I and insulin were lower in early lactating period while it showed an increase during mid- and late lactation. The present results indicated that the regulatory role for the higher mammary blood flow and milk yield during lactation in 87.5% HF are not mediated via the higher level of circulating IGF-I. Differences in mammary blood flow and milk yield between 50% HF and 87.5% HF animals are in part due to a higher concentration of circulating growth hormone. The lower level of circulating growth hormone in 50% HF animals would be regulated by higher levels of IGF-I, free fatty acid and glucose in plasma.
 Keywords
IGF-I;Growth Hormone;Mammary Blood Flow;Milk Yield;Crossbred Holstein Cattle;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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