JOURNAL BROWSE
Search
Advanced SearchSearch Tips
Growth, Hay Yield and Chemical Composition of Cassava and Stylo 184 Grown under Intercropping
facebook(new window)  Pirnt(new window) E-mail(new window) Excel Download
 Title & Authors
Growth, Hay Yield and Chemical Composition of Cassava and Stylo 184 Grown under Intercropping
Kiyothong, K.; Wanapat, M.;
  PDF(new window)
 Abstract
The objective of this field experiment was to investigate the growth, hay yield and chemical composition of cassava and stylo 184 grown under intercropping. The experiment was arranged in a Randomized Complete Block (RCB) design with 5 treatments and 4 replications. The treatments were: sole crop cassava (C); sole crop stylo 184 (S) and three intercropping treatments comprising an additive series of one (SC), two (SSC) and three (SSSC) rows of stylo 184 to one row of cassava. The results showed that leaf area per plant (LA) of cassava was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the sole crop relative to the intercropping treatments. Both total hay yield and CPDM yield were significantly higher (p<0.05) for C treatment and lower (p<0.05) for SSSC treatment. The total hay yield and CPDM yield were significantly greater (p<0.05) in the sole crop relative to the intercropping treatments. At the first and second harvests, CP content was similar among treatments; while at third and fourth harvests, CP contents were significantly greater (p<0.05) for the intercropping treatment relative to the sole crop. At the first and second harvest, NDF contents were significantly greater (p<0.05) in the sole crop relative to the intercropping treatments, whereas NDF contents were similar among intercropping treatments. Leaf area of stylo 184 at first and second harvest were significantly greater (p<0.05) for C, SC and SSC as compared with the SSSC treatments. At each harvesting, there were no significant differences in ash, CP, NDF, ADF and ADL contents of stylo 184 hay between the sole crop and intercropping treatments, except for the first harvest. ADF contents were significantly greater (p<0.05) in S, SC treatments relative to SSC and SSSC treatments. Both collective hay yield and CPDM yield of cassava and stylo 184 were significantly greater (p<0.05) for the SSC treatment and significantly lower (p<0.05) for the S treatment. Collective hay yield and CPDM yield were significantly greater (p<0.05) for the intercropping treatments relative to the sole crop. Based on this research, it was concluded that stylo 184 showed potential for intercropping with cassava. Intercropping cassava with stylo 184 has beneficial effects and can improve foliage biomass yield and soil fertility, which would be a more sustainable system than growing the cassava as a pure stand. In terms of hay yield and CP production, two rows of stylo 184 to one row of cassava could be the optimal pattern for this intercropping system.
 Keywords
Cassava;Stylo 184;Growth;Hay Yield;Chemical Composition;Intercropping;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Influence of Sulfur on Fresh Cassava Foliage and Cassava Hay Incubated in Rumen Fluid of Beef Cattle,;;;;

아세아태평양축산학회지, 2007. vol.20. 9, pp.1424-1432 crossref(new window)
2.
Effect of Levels of Supplementation of Concentrate Containing High Levels of Cassava Chip on Rumen Ecology, Microbial N Supply and Digestibility of Nutrients in Beef Cattle,;;

아세아태평양축산학회지, 2007. vol.20. 1, pp.75-81 crossref(new window)
3.
A Comparative Study on the Effect of Cassava Hay Supplementation in Swamp Buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) and Cattle (Bos indicus),;;;;;

아세아태평양축산학회지, 2007. vol.20. 9, pp.1389-1396 crossref(new window)
4.
Effects of Sunflower Oil Supplementation in Cassava Hay Based-diets for Lactating Dairy Cows,;;

아세아태평양축산학회지, 2008. vol.21. 1, pp.42-50 crossref(new window)
5.
Effect of Elemental Sulfur Supplementation on Rumen Environment Parameters and Utilization Efficiency of Fresh Cassava Foliage and Cassava Hay in Dairy Cattle,;;

아세아태평양축산학회지, 2009. vol.22. 10, pp.1366-1376 crossref(new window)
 References
1.
Association of Official Analytical Chemists (AOAC). 1990. 15th ed. Association of Official Analytical Chemists. Washington DC, USA.

2.
Ashokan, P. K., R. Vikraman and K. Sudhadara. 1985. Studies on cassava-legume intercropping systems for the Oxisols of Kerala State, India. Trop. Agric. 62(4):313-318.

3.
Burns, R. 1971. Method for estimatation of tannin in grain sorghum. Agronomy Journal 63:511-512.

4.
Carruthers, K., B. Prithiviraj, Q. Fe, D. Cloutier, R. C. Martin and D. L. Smith. 2000. Intercropping corn with soybean, lupin and forages: yield component responses. Eur. J. Agron. 12:103-115.

5.
Department of Livestock Development 2001. Forage legume information. http://www.dld.go.th.html

6.
Horne, P. M. and W. W. Sturr. 1999. Developing forage technologies with smallholder farmers-how to select the best varieties to offer farmers in Southeast Asia. ACIAR Monograph.

7.
Kiyothong, K., C. Satjipanon and P. Pholsen. 2002. Effect of cutting height and time on seed yield and seed quality of Stylosanthes guianensis CIAT 184. Songklanakarin J. Sci. Technol. 24(4):587-593.

8.
Mannetje, L.'t. and R. M. Jones. 1992. Plants Resources of Southeast Asia.No.4 Forages. p. 300.

9.
Polthanee, A. 1999. Studies on Cassava-Peanut Intercropping Patterns in an Acid Soil in Northeast Thailand. Thai J. Agric. Sci. 32(1):127-134.

10.
Polthanee, A., S. Wanapat, M. Wanapat and C. Wachirapakorn. 2001. In: Proc. International Wrokshop on Current research and development of cassava as animal feeds, organized by Khon Kaen University and Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) and Swedish Agency for Research and Cooperation with Developing Countries (SAREC), July 23-24, Kosa Hotel, Thailand.

11.
Puangchompoo, A., S. Wanapat, A. Polthanee, C. Wachirapakorn and M. Wanapat. 2001. Effect of planting methods, fertilization on cassava hay yield and chemical compositions. In: Proc. International Wrokshop on Current research and development of cassava as animal feeds, organized by Khon Kaen University and Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA) and Swedish Agency for Research and Cooperation with Developing Countries (SAREC), July 23-24, Kosa Hotel, Thailand.

12.
SAS. 1998. User's Guide: Statistics, Version 6.12th Edition. SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC.

13.
Satjipanon, C., V. Jinosaeng and V. Susaena. 1995. Forage seed production project for Southeast Asia, Annual report 1993-1994. Khon Kaen Animal Nutrition Research Center, Department of Livestock Development, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperative. pp. 124-131.

14.
Steel, R. G. D. and J. H. Torrie. 1980. Principles and Procedures of Statistics: A Biometrical Approach.McGraw-Hill, New York.

15.
Suksri, A. 1993. Effects of Complete Chemical fertilizers on Growth and Seed yield of Eight-Soybean Cultivars Grown on Yasothon Soil. Proceedings of 30th Anniversary, Department of Soil Science, Khon Kaen University, August 19-20, 1993, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

16.
Thapra Meteorological Station 2003. Weather condition data, Muang District, Khon Kaen, Thailand.

17.
Tournobeze, R. and H. Sinoquet. 1995. Light interception and partitioning in shrub/grass mixtures. Agric. Forest Meteor. 72:277-294.

18.
Vandermeer, J. H. 1990. Intercropping. In: (Ed. C. R. Carroll, J. H. Vandermeer and P. M. Rosset), Agroecology.McGraw-Hill,New York, pp. 481-516.

19.
Vandermeer, J. H. 1989. The Ecology of Intercropping. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.

20.
Van Soest, P. J. and J. B. Robertson. 1991. Methods of dietary fiber, neutral detergent fiber, and nonstarch polysaccharides in relation to animal nutrition. J. Dairy Sci. 74:3583–3597.

21.
Wanapat, M., 2003. Manipulation of cassava cultivation and utilization to improve protein to energy biomass for livestock feeding in the tropics. Asian-Aust. J. Anim. Sci. 16(3):463-472.

22.
Wanapat, M. 1999. Feeding of Ruminants in the tropics based on Local Feed Resources. Khon Kaen Publ. Comp. Ltd., Khon Kaen, Thailand. p. 236.

23.
Wanapat, M., O. Pimpa, A. Petlum and U. Boontao. 1997. Cassava hay: A new strategic feed for ruminants during the dry season. Livestock Research for Rural Development, 9(2): IRRD Home Page.

24.
Wanapat, M., O. Pimpa, W. Siphuak, T. Puramongkon, A. Petlum, U. Boontao, C. Wachirapakorn and K. Sommart. 2000. Cassava hay: an important on-farm feed for ruminants. In: Proc. (Ed. J. D. Brooker), International Workshop on Tannins in Livestock and Human Nurition. ACIAR Proc. No. 92, pp. 71-74.

25.
Wanapat, M., A. Polthanee and C. Wachirapakorn. 2002. Final Report on Livestock–Crop Systems Research Project-Thailand. The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI) and Khon Kaen University, Thailand. p. 31.

26.
Wanapat, M. and O. Poungchompu. 2001. Method for estimation of tannin by vanillin-HCl method (2001, a methode of Burns, 1971). Department of Animal Science, Khon Kean University, Khon Kaen 4002, Thailand.

27.
Willey, R. W. 1979. Intercropping-its importance and research needs. I. Competition and yield advantages. Field Crop. Abstr. 32:1-10.

28.
Willey, R. W. 1979. Intercropping-its importance and research needs: agronomy and research approaches. Field Crop Abstr. 32:78-85.