JOURNAL BROWSE
Search
Advanced SearchSearch Tips
Inbreeding Levels and Pedigree Structure of Landrace, Yorkshire and Duroc Populations of Major Swine Breeding Farms in Republic of Korea
facebook(new window)  Pirnt(new window) E-mail(new window) Excel Download
 Title & Authors
Inbreeding Levels and Pedigree Structure of Landrace, Yorkshire and Duroc Populations of Major Swine Breeding Farms in Republic of Korea
Kim, Sidong; Salces, Agapita; Min, Hongrip; Cho, Kwanghyun; Kim, Heebal;
  PDF(new window)
 Abstract
The registration data of 15 populations from nine major swine breeding farms were investigated to check levels of inbreeding and the current status of pedigree structures of breeding stocks. The average rate of inbreeding per generation was 0.208%, 0.209%, 0.098%, 0.307% and 0.071% for farms D, S, K, H, and Y in Duroc, 0.071%, 0.188%, 0.685%, 0.336%, and 0.449% for farms S, H, C, J, and W in Landrace, and 0.243%, 0.123%, 0.103%, 0.165%, and 0.286% for farms D, S, G, H, and J in Yorkshire, respectively. The average inbreeding rate was highest for Landrace, intermediate for Yorkshire, and lowest for Duroc farms. In Landrace and Yorkshire populations there were few immigrant animals per generation. In Duroc, however, there were quite large numbers of immigrant animals per generation compared to other breeds. The effective population sizes calculated from the average rate of inbreeding were distributed between 73.0 and 708.7. Specific values were 204.8, 239.7, 508.8, 163.0 and 708.2 for farms D, S, K, H, and Y in Duroc, 708.7, 266.5, 73.0, 148.9, and 111.3 for farms S, H, C, J, and W in Landrace, and 205.5, 406.0, 486.9, 302.6 and 175.0 for farms D, S, G, H, and J in Yorkshire, respectively. The values were acceptable for natural selection for fitness and inbreeding depression. The results showed that there was no cause for concern over the current inbreeding level of major swine breeding farm populations and the inbreeding level was within an acceptable range.
 Keywords
Inbreeding;Inbreeding Coefficient;Swine;Pedigree Structure;Effective Population Size;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
1.
Falconer, D. S. and Trudy F. C. Mackay. 1996. Introduction to quantitative genetics, 4th edition. Prentice Hall. London

2.
Goddard, M. G. and C. Smith. 1990. Optimum number of bull sires in dairy cattle breeding. J. Dairy Sci. 73:1113-1122

3.
Golden, B. L., W. M. Snelling and C. H. Mallinckrodt. 1992. Animal breeder's tool kit user's guide and reference manual. Colorado State Univ. Agric. Exp. Sta. Tech. Bull. LTB92-2

4.
Mandal Ajoy, K. P. Pant, P. K. Rout and R. Roy. 2004. Effects of inbreeding on lamb survival in a flock of Muzaffarnagari sheep. Asian-Aust. J. Anim. Sci. 17(5):594-597

5.
Meuwissen, T. and Z. Luo. 1992. Computing inbreeding coefficients in large populations. GSE 24(4):305-313

6.
Meuwissen, T. H. E. and J. A. Woolliams. 1994. Effective sizes of livestock populations to prevent a decline in fitness. Theor. Appl. Genet. 89:1019-1026

7.
NLRI. 2005. 2004 Annual report on the animal improvement program. NLRI, Suwon, Korea

8.
NSIF. 1987. Guidelines for Uniform Swine Improvement Programs. (Ed. C. J. Christians) National Swine Improvement Federation/Sci. Education Admin./USDA/National Pork Producers Council, Des Moines, IA

9.
Pante, M. J. R., B. Gjerde and I. McMillan. 2001. Inbreeding levels and inbreeding depression in a farmed population of rainbow trout (Onchorhynchus mykiss). Aquaculture (2001) 192:213-224 crossref(new window)

10.
Quinton, M., C. Smith and M. E. Goddard. 1992. Comparison of selection methods at the same level of inbreeding. J. Anim. Sci. 70:1060-1067

11.
Singh, M. K. and M. Gurnani. 2004. Performance evaluation of Karan Fries and Karan Swiss Cattle under closed breeding system. Asian-Aust. J. Anim. Sci. 17(1):1-6

12.
Smith, C. 1988. Selection of egg laying chickens as juveniles on the average genetic merit of their parents. Poult. Sci. 67:1655-1657