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Effect of a Mixture of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) Isomers on T Cell Subpopulation and Responsiveness to Mitogen in Splenocytes of Male Broiler Chicks
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 Title & Authors
Effect of a Mixture of Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) Isomers on T Cell Subpopulation and Responsiveness to Mitogen in Splenocytes of Male Broiler Chicks
Takahashi, Kazuaki; Kawamata, Kenji; Akiba, Yukio;
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 Abstract
The experiments were conducted to determine effects of a mixture of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers on T cell subpopulations and responsiveness to mitogen of splenocytes in male broiler chicks. In experiment 1, birds (8-d old) were fed basal, CLA-(CLA) and safflower oil-supplemented (SA) diets which were formulated by supplementary 10 g CLA or safflower oil/kg to the basal diet for 14 d. Broiler starter diet, which mainly consisted of corn and soybean meal, was served as the basal diet. Proliferative response and interleukin (IL)-2-like activity stimulated by concanavalin (Con) A at a concentration of of splenocytes in chicks fed the CLA diet were greater than in chicks fed the SA diet, but not at Con A/ml. Percentage of CD3-positive T cells in splenocytes did not differ between chicks fed the SA diet and CLA. Ratio of CD4-positive T cells to CD8- positive T cells was significantly affected by dietary fat source. In experiment 2, broiler chicks (1-d old) were fed the same diets as in experiment 1 for 14 d. Results of splenocyte proliferation to Con A were similar to those in experiment 1, but phytohemaggulutinin (PHA)- or pokeweed mitogen (PWM)- induced splenocyte proliferation did not differ between the CLA and SA fed groups. Supplementation with SA or CLA to the basal diet tended to have a depressive effect on the proliferation, with the greater effect being that of SA. In experiment 3, effect of an addition of CLA to splenocyte culture medium on splenocyte proliferation was determined. An addition of CLA to the culture medium resulted in reduction of the splenocyte proliferation to Con A, but an addition of linoleic acid. When PWM and PHA were used as mitogen, the inhibitory effect of CLA and linoleic acid on the proliferation did not differ. The results suggested that the effect of dietary CLA on splenocyte proliferation was similar to that of SA, although the effect of dietary CLA on sub-populations was slightly different from that of dietary SA. Further studies are needed to clarify whether use of CLA would be beneficial for maintaining or enhancing T cell immunity in chicks.
 Keywords
CLA;Broiler Chicks;T Cell Population;Splenocyte Proliferation;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Differential Action of trans-10, cis-12 Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Adipocyte Differentiation of Ovine and 3T3-L1 Preadipocytes,;;;;;;;;

아세아태평양축산학회지, 2009. vol.22. 11, pp.1566-1573 crossref(new window)
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