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Effect of Partial Replacement of Concentrates with Barhar (Artocarpus lakocha) Leaves on Growth Performance of Kids Fed a Mixed Jungle Grass-based Diet
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 Title & Authors
Effect of Partial Replacement of Concentrates with Barhar (Artocarpus lakocha) Leaves on Growth Performance of Kids Fed a Mixed Jungle Grass-based Diet
Das, A.; De, D.; Katole, S.;
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 Abstract
A feeding trial was conducted to study the replacement value of concentrates with Barhar (Artocarpus lakocha) leaves on growth performance of kids fed a mixed jungle grass-based diet. Fifteen Sikkim local kids, about 4 months of age and body weight ranging from 5.8 to 9.2 kg, were randomly distributed into three groups of five. Kids were stall fed ad lib with mixed jungle grass collected from the nearby forest and native scrubland. The kids in group I received supplementary concentrate (Maize 35%, mustard cake 32%, rice bran 30%, mineral mixture 2% and common salt 1%) at approximately 2% of BW. For groups II and III, 25 and 50% of the concentrate was replaced with Barhar (Artocarpus lakocha) leaves, respectively. Total dry matter intake (DMI) was not significantly different among groups. Digestibility of CP decreased (p<0.05) and that of NDF increased (p<0.01) with increasing level of Barhar leaves in the diet. Digestibility of ADF (p<0.01), hemi cellulose (p<0.05) and cellulose (p<0.01) was higher in groups II and III than in group I. Ruminal pH and TVFA concentration were not significantly different among groups. Rumen ammonia-N concentration decreased (p<0.01) with increased level of Barhar leaves in the diet. Similarly, plasma urea nitrogen and blood glucose levels were reduced (p<0.05) with increasing level of Barhar leaves in the diet. Replacement of concentrate with Barhar resulted in reduced Hb and lower serum iron concentration. Levels of other serum metabolites including minerals were not altered by the replacement. Average daily gain (ADG) was 53.3, 54.4 and 41.8 g/d in groups I, II and III, respectively. ADG was not adversely affected when the level of replacement was restricted to 25%. However, at 50% of replacement ADG was significantly lower than the control (p<0.05). Thus, it was concluded that Barhar leaves might replace 25% of the supplemental concentrate for growing Sikkim local kids fed on a mixed jungle grass-based diet.
 Keywords
Artocarpus lakocha;Barhar Leaves;Concentrate Replacement;Goat;Growth;Jungle Grass;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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