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Inhibitory effects of lysozyme on endothelial protein C 1receptor shedding in vitro and in vivo
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  • Journal title : BMB Reports
  • Volume 48, Issue 11,  2015, pp.624-629
  • Publisher : Korean Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • DOI : 10.5483/BMBRep.2015.48.11.038
 Title & Authors
Inhibitory effects of lysozyme on endothelial protein C 1receptor shedding in vitro and in vivo
Ku, Sae-Kwang; Yoon, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Han, Min-Su; Lee, Taeho; Bae, Jong-Sup;
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 Abstract
Lysozyme protects us from the ever-present danger of bacterial infection and binds to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with high affinity. Beyond its role in the activation of protein C, the endothelial cell protein C receptor (EPCR) plays an important role in the cytoprotective pathway. EPCR can be shed from the cell surface, which is mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α converting enzyme (TACE). However, little is known about the effects of lysozyme on EPCR shedding. We investigated this issue by monitoring the effects of lysozyme on phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-, interleukin (IL)-1βand cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-mediated EPCR shedding and underlying mechanism. Data demonstrate that lysozyme induced potent inhibition of PMA-, TNF-α-, IL-1β-, and CLP-induced EPCR shedding. Lysozyme also inhibited the expression and activity of PMA-induced TACE in endothelial cells. These results demonstrate the potential of lysozyme as an anti-EPCR shedding reagent against PMA-mediated and CLP-mediated EPCR shedding.
 Keywords
CLP;EPCR shedding;Lysozyme;Vascular inflammation;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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