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Characterizations of Two-step Matrix Application Procedures for Imaging Mass Spectrometry
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  • Journal title : Mass Spectrometry Letters
  • Volume 6, Issue 1,  2015, pp.21-25
  • Publisher : Korean Society Mass Spectrometry
  • DOI : 10.5478/MSL.2015.6.1.21
 Title & Authors
Characterizations of Two-step Matrix Application Procedures for Imaging Mass Spectrometry
Shimma, Shuichi;
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 Abstract
In this paper, I describe the importance of matrix spraying conditions in imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) to obtain successful imaging results. My developed matrix application methodology, which is a "two-step matrix application" sequentially combined with matrix sublimation and spraying matrix solution can provide high reproducibility and high ion yield compared with a conventional direct spraying method. However, insufficient IMS results were obtained occasionally despite the two-step method. Therefore, I wanted to characterize the methodology to continuously provide high quality data. According to my results, the sublimation time was not a strict parameter, and the most important step was the first spraying condition. This means that the extraction conditions from the tissue section and co-crystallization of the matrix were the most important factors.
 Keywords
imaging mass spectrometry;mass microscope;matrix application;tumor;anti-cancer agents;sample preparations;
 Language
English
 Cited by
1.
Recent Development of Matrix Application Procedure in MALDI-Imaging Mass Spectrometry, Journal of the Mass Spectrometry Society of Japan, 2016, 64, 5, 179  crossref(new windwow)
2.
Microscopic visualization of testosterone in mouse testis by use of imaging mass spectrometry, Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, 2016, 408, 27, 7607  crossref(new windwow)
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