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Phototactic behavior 9: phototactic behavioral response of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) to light-emitting diodes of seven different wavelengths
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 Title & Authors
Phototactic behavior 9: phototactic behavioral response of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) to light-emitting diodes of seven different wavelengths
Song, Jaeun; Jeong, Eun-Young; Lee, Hoi-Seon;
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 Abstract
The phototactic behavioral responses of Tribolium castaneum adults to light-emitting diodes (LEDs) of seven different wavelengths were determined under various conditions (light exposure times, light sources, and luminance intensities) and compared with those of a black light bulb (BLB) under laboratory conditions. Based on the attractive rate (%) of T. castaneum adults under optimal conditions (50 lx and an 48 h exposure time) in the dark, red LED () exhibited the highest potential attractive rate (97.8 %), followed by yellow (, 68.9 %), green (, 55.6 %), infrared (IR) (730 nm, 54.4 %), white (450-620 nm, 41.1 %), blue (, 34.4 %), and ultraviolet (UV) (365 nm, 0.06 %) LEDs. In comparison, red LED (97.8 %) was approximately 3.4 times more attractive to T. castaneum adults than the BLB (28.9 %). These results indicate that a red LED trap could be useful to control T. castaneum adults.
 Keywords
Attraction effects;Light-emitting diodes;Phototactic response;Tribolium castaneum;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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