JOURNAL BROWSE
Search
Advanced SearchSearch Tips
Case studies: Statistical analysis of contributions of vitamins and phytochemicals to antioxidant activities in plant-based multivitamins through generalized partially double-index model
facebook(new window)  Pirnt(new window) E-mail(new window) Excel Download
 Title & Authors
Case studies: Statistical analysis of contributions of vitamins and phytochemicals to antioxidant activities in plant-based multivitamins through generalized partially double-index model
Yoo, Jae Keun; Kwon, Oran;
  PDF(new window)
 Abstract
It is important to verify the identity of plant-based multivitamins prepared with a natural-concept and popular for daily consumption because they are easily purchased in markets with imperfect information. For this study, a generalized partially double-index model (GPDIM) was employed as a main statistical method to identify the contribution of vitamins and phytochemicals to antioxidant potentials using data on antioxidant capacities and chemical fingerprinting. A bootstrapping approach via sufficient dimension reduction is adopted to estimate the two unknown coefficient vectors in the GPDIM. Fifth order polynomial regressions are fitted to measure the contributions of vitamins and phytochemicals after estimating the coefficient vectors with the two double indices.
 Keywords
antioxidant capacity;bootstrapping;generalized partially double-index model;plant-based multivitamins;phytochemicals;sufficient dimension reduction;vitamins;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
1.
Benzie IF and Strain JJ (1996). The ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) as a measure of "antioxidant power": the FRAP assay, Analytical Biochemistry, 239, 70-76. crossref(new window)

2.
Bolling BW, Chen CY, McKay DL, and Blumberg JB (2011). Tree nut phytochemicals: composition, antioxidant capacity, bioactivity, impact factors: a systematic review of almonds, Brazils, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts, Nutrition Research Reviews, 24, 244-275. crossref(new window)

3.
Hooper J (1959). Simultaneous equations and canonical correlation theory, Econometrica, 27, 245-256. crossref(new window)

4.
Huang D, Ou B, Hampsch-Woodill M, Flanagan JA, and Prior RL (2002). High-throughput assay of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) using a multichannel liquid handling system coupled with a microplate fluorescence reader in 96-well format, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 50, 4437-4444. crossref(new window)

5.
Oehlert GW (2000). A First Course in Design and Analysis of Experiments, W. H. Freeman, New York.

6.
Paiva SA and Russell RM (1999). ${\beta}$-Carotene and other carotenoids as antioxidants, Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 18, 426-433. crossref(new window)

7.
Pietta PG (2000). Flavonoids as antioxidants, Journal of Natural Products, 63, 1035-1042. crossref(new window)

8.
Radimer K, Bindewald B, Hughes J, Ervin B, Swanson C, and Picciano MF (2004). Dietary supplement use by US adults: data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2000, American Journal of Epidemiology, 160, 339-349. crossref(new window)

9.
Singleton VL, Orthofer R, and Lamuela-Raventos RM (1999). Analysis of total phenols and other oxidation substrates and antioxidants by means of Folin-Ciocalteu reagent, Methods in Enzymology, 299, 152-178. crossref(new window)

10.
Yoo JK (2015). Generalized partially double-index model: bootstrapping and distinguishing values, Communications for Statistical Applications and Methods, 22, 305-312. crossref(new window)

11.
Walker RB and Everette JD (2009). Comparative reaction rates of various antioxidants with ABTS radical cation, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 57, 1156-1161. crossref(new window)

12.
Zheng W and Wang SY (2001). Antioxidant activity and phenolic compounds in selected herbs, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 49, 5165-5170. crossref(new window)