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Investigation of Learning Progression for Dissolution and Solution Concepts
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 Title & Authors
Investigation of Learning Progression for Dissolution and Solution Concepts
Noh, Taehee; Lee, Jaewon; Yang, Chanho; Kang, Sukjin; Kang, Hunsik;
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 Abstract
In this study, we investigated a learning progression focusing on to graders` performances with dissolution and solution concepts using the construct modeling approach. We designed a construct map describing hypothetical pathways of the concept development of dissolution and solution by analyzing both National Science Curricula and related studies. A conceptions test consisting of ordered multiple-choice items was developed and administered to 826 students. A revised construct map was derived from analyses of the results based on the partial credit model, a branch of polytomous item response theory. The sequence of dissolution and solution concepts presented in the current science curriculum was found to correspond with the learning progression of the students. However, the lower anchor, the concept of the homogeneity of particles in solution, and the factors affecting solubility were not consistent with the expected levels of the construct map. After revising the construct map, we proposed a learning progression for dissolution and solution concepts with five levels: Students of level 1 (the lower anchor) recognize the particles in the solution but misunderstand various concepts; Students of level 2 understand the homogeneity of particles in solution; Students of level 3 understand solubility and the conservation of particles during dissolution; Students of level 4 partially understand the interaction between particles; and Students of level 5 (the upper anchor) understand the interaction between particles and the factors affecting solubility.
 Keywords
learning progression;partial credit model;dissolution;solution;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
1.
기초공통개념으로서 에너지에 대한 3~9학년 학생들의 문항 반응 분석,김영민;강남화;강훈식;맹승호;이준기;

한국과학교육학회지, 2016. vol.36. 6, pp.815-833 crossref(new window)
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