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Gaza Seaport as a Way to Enhance the Palestinian Economic Development
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 Title & Authors
Gaza Seaport as a Way to Enhance the Palestinian Economic Development
Hassouna Abdallah; Nam Ki-Chan;
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 Abstract
The purpose of this paper is to present some main economic factors which influence Gaza Seaport. Without direct access to the international market, the Palestinian economy will continue its dependence on Israeli economy mainly in employment, transport facilitation, and international trade. The greatest potential for Palestinian economic growth lies in trade. The port is important for creating new job opportunities, and for enhancing exporting capabilities, which are the most essential elements for development of the Palestinian economy. Israeli policies and procedures incur Palestinian exporters additional transportation costs when delivering their products to Israeli Ports or when transit these products to neighboring countries through Israeli controlled area. The public profit for the port is greater than the private profit. Therefore, constructing the port will have a great effect on the Palestinian economy. There are many challenges facing the port, some of them are the political stability, the economies of scale, and Israeli security measures and procedures.
 Keywords
Gaza seaport;Trade logistics;Transport;Palestine economy;International trade;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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