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Three Cases of Rare Anatomic Variations of the Long Head of Biceps Brachii
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  • Journal title : Clinics in Shoulder and Elbow
  • Volume 18, Issue 2,  2015, pp.96-101
  • Publisher : Korean Shoulder and Elbow Society
  • DOI : 10.5397/cise.2015.18.2.96
 Title & Authors
Three Cases of Rare Anatomic Variations of the Long Head of Biceps Brachii
Kwak, Sang-Ho; Lee, Seung-Jun; Song, Byung Wook; Lee, Min-Soo; Suh, Kuen Tak;
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 Abstract
In general, the long head of the biceps brachii originates from the superior glenoid labrum and the supraglenoid tubercle, crosses the rotator cuff interval, and extends into the bicipital groove. However, rare anatomic variations of the origins of the long head have been reported in the past. In this report, we review the clinical history, radiologic findings, and arthroscopic identifications of 3 anatomic variants of the biceps tendon long head. As the detection of long head of biceps tendon pathology during preoperative radiologic assessment can be difficult without prior knowledge, surgeons should be aware of such possible anatomic variations.
 Keywords
Shoulder;Anatomic variation;Long head of biceps brachii;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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