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Nitrogen Removal Rate of A Subsurface Flow Treatment Wetland System Constructed on Floodplain During Its Initial Operating Stage
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 Title & Authors
Nitrogen Removal Rate of A Subsurface Flow Treatment Wetland System Constructed on Floodplain During Its Initial Operating Stage
Yang, Hong-Mo;
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 Abstract
This study was carried out to examine the nitrogen removal rate of a subsurface-flow treatment wetland system which was constructed on floodplain of the Kwangju River from May to June 2001. Its dimensions were 29m in length, 9m in width and 0.65m in depth. A bottom layer of 45cm in depth was filled with crushed granite with about in diameter and a middle layer of 10cm in depth had pea pebbles with about 10 mm in diameter. An upper layer of 5 cm in depth contained course sand. Reeds (Phragmites australis) were transplanted on the surface of the system. They were dug out of natural wetlands and stems were cut at about 40 cm height from their bottom ends. Water of the Kwangju River flowed into it via a pipe by gravity flow and its effluent was funneled back into the river. The height of reed stems was 44.2 cm in July 2001 and 75.3cm in September 2001. The number of stems was increased from in July 2001 to in September 2001. Volume and water quality of inflow and outflow were analyzed from July 2001 through December 2001. Inflow and outflow averaged 40.0 and , respectively. Hydraulic detention time was about 1.5 days. Average nitrogen uptake by reeds was . Removal rate of , , T-N averaged 195.58, 53.65, and , respectively. Changes of and abatement rates were closely related to those of wetland temperatures. The lower removal rate of nitrogen species compared with that of subsurface-flow wetlands operating in North America could be attributed to the initial stage of the system and inclusion of two cold months into the six-month monitoring period. Increase of standing density of reeds within a few years will develop both root zones suitable for the nitrification of ammonia and surface layer substrates beneficial to the denitrification of nitrates into nitrogen gases, which may lead to increment in the nitrogen retention rate.
 Keywords
subsurface flow wetlands;T-N;ammonification;nitrification;denitrification;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
 References
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