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Kinetic Responses of Soil Carbon Dioxide Emission to Increasing Urea Application Rate
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 Title & Authors
Kinetic Responses of Soil Carbon Dioxide Emission to Increasing Urea Application Rate
Lee, Sun-Il; Lim, Sang-Sun; Lee, Kwang-Seung; Kwak, Jin-Hyeob; Jung, Jae-Woon; Ro, Hee-Myoung; Choi, Woo-Jung;
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 Abstract
BACKGROUND: Application of urea may increase emission from soils due both to generation from urea hydrolysis and fertilizer-induced decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC). The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of increasing urea application on emission from soil and mineralization kinetics of indigenous SOC. METHODS AND RESULTS: Emission of from a soil amended with four different rates (0, 175, 350, and 700 mg N/kg soil) of urea was investigated in a laboratory incubation experiment for 110 days. Cumulative emission () was linearly increased with urea application rate due primarily to the contribution of urea-C through hydrolysis to total emission. First-order kinetics parameters (, mineralizable SOC pool size; k, mineralization rate) became greater with increasing urea application rate; increased from 665.1 to 780.3 mg C/kg and k from 0.024 to 0.069 , determinately showing fertilizer-induced SOC mineralization. The relationship of (non-linear) and k (linear) with urea-N application rate revealed different responses of and k to increasing rate of fertilizer N. CONCLUSION(s): The relationship of mineralizable SOC pool size and mineralization rate with urea-N application rate suggested that increasing N fertilization may accelerate decomposition of readily decomposable SOC; however, it may not always stimulate decomposition of non-readily decomposable SOC that is protected from microbial decomposition.
 Keywords
First-order kinetics; emission;Carbon mineralization;Fertilizer application rate;Soil organic carbon;
 Language
English
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