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Change of Regional Atmospheric Circulation Related with Recent Warming in the Antarctic Peninsula
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  • Journal title : Ocean and Polar Research
  • Volume 25, Issue 4,  2003, pp.503-518
  • Publisher : Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology
  • DOI : 10.4217/OPR.2003.25.4.503
 Title & Authors
Change of Regional Atmospheric Circulation Related with Recent Warming in the Antarctic Peninsula
Lee, Jeong-Soon; Kwon, Tae-Yong; Lee, Bang-Yong; Yoon, Ho-Il; Kim, Jeong-Woo;
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 Abstract
This study examines the relationship among temperature, wind, and sea level pressure to understand recent warming in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula. To do this, the surface air temperature, NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind data and sea level pressure data for the period of 40 years are analyzed. The 40-year surface air temperature data in the Antarctic Peninsula reveals relatively the larger warming trends for autumn and winter than other seasons. The variability of the surface air temperature in this region is compared with that of the regional atmospheric circulation. The surface air temperature is positively correlated with frequency of northwesterlies and negatively correlated with frequency of southeasterlies. This relation is more evident in the northern tip of the Antarctic Peninsula for autumn and winter. The trend analysis of wind frequency in the study area shows increasing and decreasing trends in the frequency of northwesterlies and southeasterlies, respectively, in the northwestern part of the Weddell Sea for autumn and winter. And also it is found that these winds are closely related with decreasing of sea level pressure in the southeastern region of the Antarctic Peninsula. Furthermore from the seasonal variation of sea level pressure in this area, it may be presumed that decreasing of sea level pressure in the southeastern region of the Antarctic Peninsula is related with warming in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula for autumn and winter. Therefore it can be explained that recent warming in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula is caused by positive feedback mechanism, that is, the process that warming in the vicinity of the Antarctic Peninsula can lead to the decrease of sea level pressure in the southeastern region of the Antarctic Peninsula and these pressure decrease in turn lead to the variation of wind direction in northwestern part of Weddell Sea, again the variation of wind direction enhances the warming in the Antarctic Peninsula.
 Keywords
Antarctic Peninsula;warming;temperature;wind;sea level pressure;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
1.
Recent Changes in Downward Longwave Radiation at King Sejong Station, Antarctica, Journal of Climate, 2008, 21, 22, 5764  crossref(new windwow)
2.
Net radiation and turbulent energy exchanges over a non-glaciated coastal area on King George Island during four summer seasons, Antarctic Science, 2008, 20, 01  crossref(new windwow)
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