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Water Masses and Flow Fields of the Southern Ocean Measured by Autonomous Profiling Floats (Argo floats)
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  • Journal title : Ocean and Polar Research
  • Volume 27, Issue 2,  2005, pp.183-188
  • Publisher : Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology
  • DOI : 10.4217/OPR.2005.27.2.183
 Title & Authors
Water Masses and Flow Fields of the Southern Ocean Measured by Autonomous Profiling Floats (Argo floats)
Park, Young-Gyu; Oh, Kyung-Hee; Suk, Moon-Sik;
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 Abstract
Using data from Argo floats collected in the Southern Ocean, we describe water mass prop erties and flow fields at intermediate levels (1000m and 2000m levels). Water mass properties from Argo floats, which are consistent with those from previous hydrographic surveys, reflect the movement of the floats well even without quality control on the Argo data. Since the flow fields from the Argo floats do not cover the entire Southern Ocean, we could not obtain a general circulation pattern, especially at the 2000m level. We, however, can confirm the general eastward tendency due to ACC largely following the topography.
 Keywords
Southern Ocean;Argo float;water mass;intermediate level flow;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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