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Generation of a Standard Typhoon using for Surge Simulation Consistent with Wind in Terms of Return Period
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 Title & Authors
Generation of a Standard Typhoon using for Surge Simulation Consistent with Wind in Terms of Return Period
Kang, Ju Whan; Kim, Yang-Seon; Kwon, Soon-Duck; Choun, Young-Sun;
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 Abstract
Extreme wind speeds at four sites including Mokpo, Gunsan, Incheon and Jeju near the Western Coast have been estimated with a tool of Monte Carlo simulation and typhoon data. Results of sensitivity analysis show that closeness between distance to the eye and the radius to maximum wind is most sensitive. While location angle and pressure deficit are sensitive too, but translation velocity is not. A standard typhoon, which results in extreme wind speeds having various return period, can be constructed by combination of parameter informations of each site. Then, with a numerical modelling of the typhoon, extreme surge heights having the same return period can also be obtained. To be added, by analysing the data which only including those based on navigable semicircle, it is possible to produce a standard typhoon which could result in setting-down of sea level.
 Keywords
standard typhoon;sensitivity analysis;return period;monte carlo simulation;western coast;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
1.
표준태풍 모의를 통한 해일고 빈도해석,강주환;김양선;

한국해안해양공학회논문집, 2016. vol.28. 5, pp.284-291 crossref(new window)
1.
Frequency Analysis on Surge Height by Numerical Simulation of a Standard Typhoon, Journal of Korean Society of Coastal and Ocean Engineers, 2016, 28, 5, 284  crossref(new windwow)
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