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Characterization of Culturable Bacteria in the Atmospheric Environment in Incheon, Korea
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 Title & Authors
Characterization of Culturable Bacteria in the Atmospheric Environment in Incheon, Korea
Lee, Siwon; Park, Su Jeong; Kim, Ji Hye; Min, Byung-Dae; Chung, Hyen-Mi; Park, Sangjung;
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 Abstract
Objectives: This study aims to provide basic data regarding the bacterial total plate count in the atmospheric environment for related studies. Methods: Total plate count and the identification of culturable bacteria in the atmospheric environment in Incheon took place in 2015 using periodic survey. Correlationship analysis was performed between the number of culturable bacteria and environmental elements. In addition, an estimation of novel bacterial species was undertaken using the similarities and phylogenetic tree based on the 16S rRNA gene. Results: The total plate count of culturable bacteria was on average , and did not exceed in the atmospheric environment. Periodic monthly measuring of total plate count was highest in June at , while the lowest was in July at . Furthermore, as a result of the identification of culturable bacteria, the genera Arthrobacter and Kocuria were dominant, while novel bacterial taxa that belong to the genera Chryseobacterium and Herbiconiux were separated. Conclusion: The total number of culturable bacteria from the atmospheric environment in Korea is on average . In addition, the genera Arthrobacter and Kocuria dominate. The presence of novel bacterial taxa are expected in the atmospheric environment, such as belonging to the genera Chryseobacterium and Herbiconiux.
 Keywords
Atmospheric environment;Total plate counts;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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