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Kinetic Studies for the Reactions of Pyridine with Benzoylchlorides under High Pressure and High Vacuum
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 Title & Authors
Kinetic Studies for the Reactions of Pyridine with Benzoylchlorides under High Pressure and High Vacuum
Kim, Se-Kyong;
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 Abstract
The reaction rates of para-substituted benzoyl chlorides (, p-H, ) with pyridine have been measured employing the conductometry method in acetonitrile. The pseudo first-order and second-order rate constants were determined at various pressures and temperatures. The activation parameters () and the Hammett -values are determined from the values of rate constant. The values of are all negative. The Hammett -values are positive for the substrate () over the given pressure range. The results of kinetic studies, for the pressure and substituent changes, show that these reactions are proceeded by a typical reaction mechanism and its bond formation is favored with elevating pressure.
 Keywords
Conductometry;Kinetic;High Pressure;High Vacuum;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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