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The Popularity of Picture Books with Television Tie-in Contents in the Public Library
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 Title & Authors
The Popularity of Picture Books with Television Tie-in Contents in the Public Library
Ladd, Patricia R.;
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 Abstract
This study analyzes circulation statistics of television tie-in picture books from the Wake County Public Library System in North Carolina to determine their popularity among patrons. Caldecott winning picture books were used as a point of comparison. This study also examined OPAC holdings from North Carolina public libraries to determine television tie-in picture book popularity among collection builders. The findings of the study show that television tie-in picture books are found to some degree in the vast majority of North Carolina public libraries, and are more popular than award winners in the Wake County system.
 Keywords
Public Libraries;Children's Literature;Library Circulation, Children's;Television Programs;Picture Book Contents;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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