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Information, Knowledge, Wisdom: A Progressive a Value Added Chain
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 Title & Authors
Information, Knowledge, Wisdom: A Progressive a Value Added Chain
Satija, Mohinder Partap;
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 Abstract
The paper lists problems in defining information and knowledge and also in differentiating between the two. It separately describes physical, economic and cognitive properties of information and knowledge. A long drawn comparative chart of the nature, characteristics and properties of knowledge and information is given. In addition it explains their relation with wisdom. The paper emphasizes that knowledge is only a human preserve. Also it finds common grounds and mutual dependence between information, knowledge and wisdom. The purpose is to clear confusion between knowledge and information, and find their relation with wisdom and tradition by placing these in value added and evolutionary chain: Signals--data-- Information--Knowledge--Wisdom--Tradition.
 Keywords
Cognition;Data;Information;Knowledge;Memory;Tradition;Wisdom;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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