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A Study on Jeollajwasuyeong Dongheon in the Late Joseon Dynasty
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  • Journal title : Journal of architectural history
  • Volume 25, Issue 2,  2016, pp.57-68
  • Publisher : Korean Association of Architectural History
  • DOI : 10.7738/JAH.2016.25.2.057
 Title & Authors
A Study on Jeollajwasuyeong Dongheon in the Late Joseon Dynasty
Shin, Woong-Ju; Cheon, Yeol-Hong;
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 Abstract
This study explored the Jeollajwasuyeong Dongheon in the Late Joseon dynasty and its findings are as follows. Buildings in Jeollajwasuyeong were completed since the mid-18th century. They formed areas based on functions and were largely classified into two areas. The buildings within Yeongseong included Gaeksa (guesthouse), Dongheon(government office), Hyangcheong(advisory organ), Jungyeong(military camp), Guncheong (county office), Gongbang(workroom), and Changgo(warehouse). There were also buildings for low-ranking government officials. The central part of Jeollajwasuyeong was the areas of Gaeksa and Dongheon. Gaeksa was iconic area where local governors served King and had 75 Jinnamgwan Guesthouses and 3 inner gates. Those were measured off by separate walls. The Dongheon area was located in the northeast of Gaeksa. There were three gates such as Wanyeongru, Gongsamun, and Jeongbyeonmun at the entry area, which were also divided by walls like Gaeksa. Unjuheon (Dongheon) was at the center of the area where Gyeolseungdang, Mugwonjae, Naea, Chaekbang, and Gongsu were built. Outside the area, Baekwadang(used as Bijangcheong), Jinhyulgo, and Byeonggo were composed of part of the Dongheon area. Most of the buildings in Dongheon seemed to be repaired since 1664. It was difficult to locate the area of previous Dongheon. In particular, Jinnamgwan was first built in 1599 and destroyed by fire in 1716. In 1718, the building was reconstructed and shared historic denominator with Unjuheon before 1858 and reconstructed Unjuheon in 1869. It was found that Unjuheon was reconstructed more than at least three times, which was the central building in Dongheon. The buildings including Gyeolseungdang, Mugwonjae, and Baekwadang in the area were not existed within Jeollajwasuyeong and were reconstructed more than once and maintained until the early 1900s.
 Keywords
Jeollajwasuyeong;Dongheon;Yeosu;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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