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Interpretation on Making Techniques of Some Ancient Ceramic Artifacts from Midwestern Korean Peninsula: Preliminary Study
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  • Journal title : Journal of Conservation Science
  • Volume 32, Issue 2,  2016, pp.273-291
  • Publisher : The Korean Society Of Conservation Science For Cultural Properties
  • DOI : 10.12654/JCS.2016.32.2.15
 Title & Authors
Interpretation on Making Techniques of Some Ancient Ceramic Artifacts from Midwestern Korean Peninsula: Preliminary Study
Lee, Chan Hee; Jin, Hong Ju; Choi, Ji Soo; Na, Geon Ju;
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 Abstract
Some ceramic artifacts representing time-wise from comb pattern pottery in the Neolithic Age to white porcelain in Joseon Dynasty were selected from 7 sites in the north and south area of Charyeong Mountain Range in order to making techniques interpretation and development process of ancient ceramics through physicochemical and mineralogical quantitative analysis. Studied pottery samples in the Prehistoric times showed trace of ring piling in soft-type, and pottery in the Three Kingdoms Period had both soft and hard-type but kettle-ware and storage-ware were made with ring piling, but table-ware was made by wheel spinning. Different from pottery after the Three Kingdom Period when refinement of source clay was high, pottery in the Neolithic Age and in the Bronze Age exhibited highly mineral content in sandy source clay, which showed a lot of larger temper than source clay. Groundmass of celadon and white porcelain almost did not reveal primary minerals but had high content of minerals by high temperature firing. Ceramic samples showed some different in major and minor elements according to sites irrespective of times. Geochemical behaviors are very similar indicating similar basic characteristics of source clay. However, loss-on-ignition showed 0.01 to 12.59wt.% range with a large deviation but it rapidly decreased moving from the Prehistoric times to the Three Kingdom Period. They have correlation with the weight loss due to firings, according to burning degree of source clay and detection of high temperature minerals, estimated firing temperatures are classified into 5 groups. Pottery in the Neolithic Age and in the Bronze Age belongs from 750 to group; pottery in the Three Kingdom Period are variously found in 750 to range of firing temperature; and it is believed celadon and white porcelain were baked in high temperature of 1,150 to . It seems difference between refinement of source clay and firing temperature based on production times resulted from change in raw material supply and firing method pursuant to development of production skill. However, there was difference in production methods even at the same period and it is thought that they were utilized according to use purpose and needs instead of evolved development simply to one direction.
 Keywords
Charyeong Mountain Range;Ancient ceramic;Making techniques;Source clay;Firing temperature;Raw material supply;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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