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Comparison of Grip and Pinch Strength between Dominant and Non-dominant Hand according to Type of Handedness of Female College Students
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 Title & Authors
Comparison of Grip and Pinch Strength between Dominant and Non-dominant Hand according to Type of Handedness of Female College Students
Kim, Ji-Sung; Lee, Sa-Gyeom; Park, Sung-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Min; Kim, Bo-Kyung; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Soon-Hee;
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 Abstract
In using both hands, everyone dominantly use one hand and it is called left-handedness or right-handedness person. Measurements of grip and pinch strength provide objective indexes to represent functional integrity of the upper extremity. This study was conducted for thirty female college students(19 right-handedness and 11 lefthandedness). For assessment of the type of handedness, questionnaire was used; for grip strength, Jamar dynamometer was used; for pinch strength, Jamar pinch gauge was used. In right handedness, the grip and pinch strength of the dominant right hand was significantly higher than those of the non-dominant hand. In addition, regular exercises were shown to give influences on reduction of strength gaps between dominant and non-dominant hands. In both groups of left and right handedness, the grip and pinch strength of the dominant hand were significantly higher than those of the non-dominant hand, and regular exercises were shown to give influences on reduction of strength gaps between dominant and non-dominant hand.
 Keywords
Type of Handedness;Dominant and Non-dominant Hand;Grip Strength;Pinch Strength;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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