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Comparison Analysis of Lower Extremities Activity while Walking Downhill according to the Height of Heel for Women in 20's
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 Title & Authors
Comparison Analysis of Lower Extremities Activity while Walking Downhill according to the Height of Heel for Women in 20's
Kim, Hyeun-Ae; Kim, Hee-Tak;
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 Abstract
The purpose of this study is to measure the effect of change in heel height on lower extremities activity of young women on high-heeled shoes that young women prefer from more kinetic and realistic perspective as this study changes the degree of slope on a treadmill. The study subjects are 15 young and healthy women who do not have any external injuries or problem with walking and understand the purpose of this study clearly. They wore three different height of heels(1cm, 7cm, 12cm) and walked on a treadmill at a constant speed of 3km/h. EMG value of four muscles (anterior tibial muscle, gastrocnemius muscle, straight muscle of thigh, and biceps muscle of thigh) were collected when walking and the change according to the height of heels were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Multiple comparison analysis on anterior tibial muscle and heel height showed that the group with 12cm heel showed significantly high muscle activation compared to the groups with 1cm and 7cm heels. The result of this study can be used for various perspectives from inferring and mediating problems caused by wearing high heels on different ground slopes for a long time.
 Keywords
Heel Height;Walking;Lower Extremities Activity;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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