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Effects of White Noises on Gait Ability of Hemiplegic Patients during Circuit Balance Training
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 Title & Authors
Effects of White Noises on Gait Ability of Hemiplegic Patients during Circuit Balance Training
Jang, Na-Young; Kim, Gi-Do; Kim, Bo-Kyoung; Kim, Eun-Hee; Koo, Ja-Pung; Shin, Hee-Joon; Choi, Seok-Joo; Choi, Wan-Suk;
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 Abstract
This study examines the effects of different environments on the application of hemiplegia patients circuit balance training. Group 1 performed circuit balance training without any auditory intervention Group 2 performed training in noiseless environments and Group 3 performed training in white noise environments. First, among lower extremity muscular strength evaluation items, maximum activity time(MAT) was not significantly different(p>.05). Maximum muscle strength(MMS) increased significantly in Group 3(p<.01), there was no significant difference in MMS among the groups. Average muscle strength(AMS) indexes also significantly increased in Group 3(p<.01), there was no significant difference in AMS among the groups. Second, among balancing ability evaluation items, Berg's balance scale(BBS) scores significantly increased in all groups(p<.05), BBS scores were significantly difference among the groups. Based on the results, Group 1, 2 and Group 1, 3 showed significant increases (p<.05). Functional reach test(FRT) values significantly increased in Group 2, 3(p<.05), and there was no significant difference in FRT values among the groups. Timed up and go(TUG) test values significantly decreased in Group 2, 3(p<.05), and there was no significant difference in TUG test values among the groups. Third, among walking speed evaluation items, the time required to walk 10m significantly decreased in all groups(p<.05), and there was no significant difference in the values among the groups. Average walking speeds showed significant increases in Group 1, 3(p<.05), and there was no significant difference in the values among the groups. Based on the results of this study, noise environments should be improved by either considering auditory interventions and noiseless environments, or by ensuring that white noise environments facilitate the enhancement of balancing ability.
 Keywords
White Noise;Circuit Balance Training;Gait Ability;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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