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The Influence of Body Support Treadmill Training with Visual Feedback on the Gait Factors of Stroke Patients
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 Title & Authors
The Influence of Body Support Treadmill Training with Visual Feedback on the Gait Factors of Stroke Patients
Jegal, Hyuk; Kim, Ki Jong; Jun, Hyun Ju;
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 Abstract
The aim of this research was to investigate how the effects of body supported treadmill training with visual feedback affect the gait factors of stroke patients. Thirty subjects (21 male, 9 female) with a diagnosis of stroke were taken to the hospital to participate in this study. The subjects received body supported treadmill training with visual feedback. The training was executed for 6 minutes, 3 times a day per week for 19 weeks after general exercise. The effects of the visual feedback in the body supported treadmill training were evaluated by measuring the average gait cycle and the average step length of the affected and unaffected. The collected data were statistically analyzed by using a paired t-test. The results of this study were a significant improvement of the average gait cycle and no statistically significant difference of the average step length. The gait cycle average had a statistically significant difference in gender, age, etiology, paretic side, and step length average. There was no statistically significant difference in infarction within etiology. Therefore, it was necessary to apply the easy and simple with the treadmill training in the rehabilitation of the stroke patients. This study will require a variety of outcome measures related to the effects of treadmill training with gait factors.
 Keywords
Stroke;Treadmill Training with Visual Feedback;Gait Factors;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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