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Effect of Ankle Joint Mobilization and FES on Change of Ankle Movement and the Quality of Gait in Patients with Hemiplegia
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 Title & Authors
Effect of Ankle Joint Mobilization and FES on Change of Ankle Movement and the Quality of Gait in Patients with Hemiplegia
Lee, Hyun Suk; Park, Si Eun; Lee, Sang Bin; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Shin, Hee Joon; Kim, Hong Rae; Choi, Young Duk; Min, Kyung Ok;
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 Abstract
This study was conducted to investigate the effect of FES and ankle mobilization on the ankle motion and the quality of gait of chronic hemiplegic patients with limited ankle joint motions. As research subjects, 24 chronic hemiplegic patients who could walk independently, regardless of assistive aids, were selected. Then, 8 subjects received mobilization randomly and 8 subjects received FES and 8 subjects received mobilization and FES, at the same time. The dorsiflexion PROM significantly increased in the group of mobilization therapy, mobilization and FES all together(p<.01). There were statistically significant differences among the three groups(p<.01). The 10m walking test significantly decreased in the group of mobilization therapy, mobilization and FES all together(p<.05). There were statistically significant differences among the three groups(p<.01). The gait velocity significantly increased in the group of mobilization therapy, FES therapy, mobilization and FES all together(p<.05). There were statistically significant differences among the three groups(p<.01). The stride length significantly increased in the group of mobilization therapy, mobilization and FES all together(p<.05). There were statistically significant differences among the three groups(p<.05). In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that rather than only using one treatment technique, applying mobilization and FES together brings a more satisfactory result to hemiplegic patients with limited ankle joint motions.
 Keywords
hemiplegic patients;ankle movement;mobilization;FES;
 Language
English
 Cited by
 References
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