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The Impact of Cervical Stretching Exercise and Cervical Traction on Cervical Pain and Muscle Activity among Patients with Cervical Hypolordosis
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 Title & Authors
The Impact of Cervical Stretching Exercise and Cervical Traction on Cervical Pain and Muscle Activity among Patients with Cervical Hypolordosis
An, Ho Jung; Choi, Jung Hyun;
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 Abstract
The purpose of this study is to provide fundamental clinical data for the treatment plan and rehabilitation of patients with cervical hypolordosis by comparing the cervical headache and muscle activity after cervical stretching exercise and cervical traction, which are generally applied to patients with cervical hypolordosis. The research subjects included 20 patients without gender division who were diagnosed with cervical hypolordosis. After applying cervical stretching exercise and cervical traction for six weeks, cervical headache and the activity of the muscles around the cervical vertebra(upper trapezius muscle, sternocleidomastoid muscle, splenius capitis muscle, and anterior temporal muscle) were investigated and the following results were obtained. In a comparison of the within group intervention effects of the two groups, cervical pain statistically significantly decreased in the cervical stretching exercise group. According to the results of analyzing the change of muscle tension in the upper trapezius muscle, both the cervical traction group and showed a statistically significant within group difference in the left and right side. According to the results of analyzing the change in the muscle tension of the splenius capitis muscle, both groups showed a statistically significant within group difference in the left and right side. In a between-group comparison, a statistically significant difference in the right side was observed. These results confirm that cervical vertebra traction and cervical stretching exercise decrease the cervical headache and muscle activity of the upper trapezius muscle and the splenius capitis muscle among patients with cervical hypolordosis.
 Keywords
Cervical Stretching Exercise;Cervical Traction;Cervical Hypolordosis;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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