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The effects of performing a one-legged bridge with use of a sling on trunk and gluteal muscle activation
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 Title & Authors
The effects of performing a one-legged bridge with use of a sling on trunk and gluteal muscle activation
Cho, Minkwon; Bak, Jongwoo; Chung, Yijung;
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 Abstract
Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the activation of trunk and gluteal muscles during bridge exercises with a sling (BS), single-legged bridge exercise with a sling (SBS), single-legged bridge exercise (SB), and general bridge exercise (GB). Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: Twenty-five healthy participants (19 males and 6 females, aged 27.8 [4.78]) voluntarily participated in this study. In the bridging exercise, each subject lifted their pelvis with their legs and feet in contact with the sling or normal surface. The electrical activities of the erector spinae (ES), gluteus maximus (GM), external oblique (EO), and internal oblique (IO) muscles during the bridging exercises on the 2 surfaces were measured using surface electromyography. Subjects practiced each of the four bridge condition three times in random order and average values were obtained. Results: On the ipsilateral side, activities of the IO, EO, and ES during SBS was significantly higher than those during BS, SB, and GB (p<0.05). Activities of the IO and EO during SB was significantly higher than those during BS and GB (p<0.05). On the contralateral side, activities of the GM and EO during SB and SBS was significantly higher than that during BS and GB (p<0.05). These results verify the theory that the use of sling and single leg lift increases the activation trunk and gluteal muscles during bridging exercises. Conclusions: The single-legged bridge exercise with a sling can be recommended as an effective method to facilitate trunk and gluteal muscle activities.
 Keywords
Electromyography;Exercise;Muscle activation;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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