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Electrodermal Activity at Palms according to Pressure Stimuli applied to the Scapula
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 Title & Authors
Electrodermal Activity at Palms according to Pressure Stimuli applied to the Scapula
Kim, Jae-Hyung; Park, Gun-Cheol; Baik, Sung-Wan; Jeon, Gye-Rok;
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 Abstract
The system for measuring the electrodermal activity (EDA) signal occurring at the sweet glands in the human body was implemented in this study. The EDA measurement system (EDAMS) consisted of an algometer and the bio-potential measurement system (BPMS). Three experiments were performed using EDAMS. First, the linearity of the output voltage corresponding to the pressure being applied to an algometer was evaluated. The linearity of output voltage according to the pressure was 0.956. Second, the amplitude and the latency of the EDA signal at the left palm was obtained while applying the pressure stimuli to the left and right scapula. The latency of EDA signal was shorter whereas the amplitude of EDA signal was higher when the pressure applied was applied to the left scapula. Third, the amplitude and latency of the EDA was measured at left and right palm while increasing the pressure stimuli to the left scapula. The latency of EDA signal at left and right palm was decreased according to the intensity of pressure stimulus applied to the left scapula. However, the latency of the EDA signals did not show the linearity with respect to the pressure stimuli.
 Keywords
Electrodermal Activity (EDA);Electrodermal Activity Measurement System (EDAMS);Algometer;Sweat Glands;Amplitude and Latency;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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