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Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis at Inner Forearms of the Human Body using Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement System
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 Title & Authors
Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis at Inner Forearms of the Human Body using Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement System
Kim, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Soo-Hong; Baik, Sung-Wan; Jeon, Gye-Rok;
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 Abstract
The bioelectrical impedance (BI) at the inner forearms was measured using bioelectrical impedance measurement system (BIMS), which employs the multi-frequency and the two-electrode method. Experiments were performed as follows. First, while applying a constant alternating current of 800A to the inner region of the forearms, BI (Z) was measured at nineteen frequencies ranging from 5 to 500 kHz. The prediction marker (PM) was calculated for right and left forearm. The resistance (R) and the reactance (Xc) were simultaneously measured during impedance measurement. Second, a Cole-Cole plot (relationship between reactance and resistance) was obtained for left and right forearm, indicating the different characteristic frequencies (fc). Third, the phase angle was obtained, indicating strong dependence on the applied frequency.
 Keywords
Bioelectrical Impedance;Impedance Analyzer;Resistance (R);Reactance (Xc);Phase Angle (θ);Extracellular Fluid (ECF);Intracellular Fluid (ICF);
 Language
English
 Cited by
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