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A Studs on Farmers Syndrome and Its Risk Factors of Vinylhouse Workers and Evaluation of Risk Factors of Vinylhouse Works
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 Title & Authors
A Studs on Farmers Syndrome and Its Risk Factors of Vinylhouse Workers and Evaluation of Risk Factors of Vinylhouse Works
Lee, Jung-Jeung;
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 Abstract
Objectives: In order to estimate risk factors affecting the health of vinylhouse workers and harmful environments in vinylhouse working. Methods: The investigator performed questionnaires and laboratory examinations on 102 vinylhouse workers and 69 farmers in 7 myoens (Korean subcounties). one eup (a Korean town), Goryeong-gun, Gyeongsangbuk-do between April 8 and 18, 2004 (for 11 days), and measured the heavy metal in the air and the soil, temperature, humidity, air current, harmful gases in vinylhouses. Results: Even in cloudy days, the temperature in vinylhouses in daylight was and the temperature difference between inside and outside vinylhouses was around . Oxygen concentration was similar inside and outside vinylhouses, while carbon dioxide concentration was lower inside than outside vinylhouses. Carbon monoxide was not detected. In the air inside vinylhouses, cadmium was not detected. Lean concentration in the soil was lower inside vinylhouses than outside vinylhouses at surface, while cadmium concentration was similar inside and outside vinylhouses in the soil except some areas. Out of male vinylhouse workers. 16.4---- were positive farmer's syndrome and 49.2---- were suspicious, while out of females, 41.5---- were positive and 46.3---- were suspicious. Out of male farmers, 30.4---- were positive farmer's syndrome, while out of female farmers, 60.0---- were positive and 28.3---- were suspicious. There was no difference between vinylhouse workers and farmers in the distribution of hypertension and abnormal liver function, while diabetes mellitus was more common in farmers than in vinylhouse workers. Vinylhouse working, sex, and hours of farming per day were selected as significant variables affecting farmer's syndrome in this study, and the rate of positive farmer's syndrome was rather lower in vinylhouse workers than in farmers. Females were higher than males in the rate, and those who farmed at least 10 hours per day were higher in the rate than those who farmed less than 10 hours per day. Out of the vinylhouse workers, no differences were found between the distribution of farmer's syndrome and farming-related variables such as the total period of farming, the size of farm land, the mean farming hours per day, the number of family members who farm together, the frequency of scattering agricultural chemicals. In addition, there were no differences between the distribution and the wearing masks and protectors and personal sanitation among those who scattered agricultural chemicals by themselves. There were no differences found in blood lean concentration, urinary cadmium concentration, serum cholinesterase, and hemoglobin according to the distribution of farmer's syndrome. In the vinylhouse workers, females were higher than males in the rate of farmer's syndrome, and those who farmed at least 10 hours per day were higher in the rate than those who farmed less than 10 hours per day. Meanwhile, the rate was lower in those who slept at least 8 hours a day than in those who slept less than 8 hours. Conclusions: In conclusion, the physical environments inside vinylhouses were harmful, but no significant difference was found in harmfulness of the chemical environments. The chronic diseases such as farmer's syndrome. hypertension, diabetes, and dyshepatia were not common in the vinylhouse workers than in the farmers. Meanwhile, farmer's syndrome was more common in the vinylhouse workers who worked longer and slept less.
 Keywords
Farmers syndrome;Vinylhouse workers;Risk factors of vinylhouse works;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by