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Types and Characteristics of South Korean Crossover Picturebooks
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 Title & Authors
Types and Characteristics of South Korean Crossover Picturebooks
Ko, Seonju;
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 Abstract
This study explored types and characteristics of South Korean crossover picturebooks that are enjoyed across generations. Participants included three publishers, six critics, six illustrators and three picturebook researchers, and focused on 92 South Korean recommended picturebooks published from 1995 to 2014 as the research material for this study. The majority of Korean crossover picturebook type was story, followed by information and art. There were few wordless books. Common themes of the story picturebooks were contemplation, traditional culture, social changes (such as immigration and redevelopment), reminiscence, social relations, loss and death, family problems, and social incidents. Classic essays and novels were revised for picturebooks as were famous poems originally written for grown-ups. Informational books were about traditions in music, architecture, furniture and special occasions like wedding and ceremonies. The style of the drawings were precise and realistic. Some drawings were done by brush and Chinese ink on hanji (traditional Korean paper) or silk. Some books featured Korean calligraphy as well, enabling adult readers to also appreciate the beauty and delicacy of the books. Art books and wordless books were quite rare and exhibited a playful tone. Adults alone were not presumed to be the primary reading audience of the picture books. Implications were made for picturebook marketing in a society such as South Korea, where the elderly population is rapidly increasing. Various forms of art books and parodies were also welcome. One conclusion of the study was that more experimental and innovative works would be encouraging for the development of South Korean crossover picturebooks.
 Keywords
Korean crossover picturebooks;types;characteristics;children;adults;
 Language
English
 Cited by
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