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Seat Belt Usage Rate and Unconscious Behavior in the Fastening Process
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 Title & Authors
Seat Belt Usage Rate and Unconscious Behavior in the Fastening Process
Hong, Seung-Kweon;
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 Abstract
Seat belt is an important means to protect drivers and passengers from the damages by car accidents. Many ways to increase the seat belt wearing rate have been proposed through human factors researches. The primary ways to increase seat belt use rate have emphasized the intention-behavior cycle. This study focused on the gap between intention and behavior. The gap may be bridged by the habit for seat belt use behavior. Divers following a desirable car starting sequence, from sitting on the chair, fastening seat belt, starting engine to moving a car, reported that higher belt wearing rate and unconscious behavior (automated response). That is, the habitualized procedure knowledge prevented drivers from forgetting to fasten their seat belt. The reminder systems such as warning light and warning sound could not significantly give an influence in remembering to fasten seat belt. In order to increase the seat belt use rate, the desirable car starting procedure should be included in the driving education program.
 Keywords
Seat belt;Procedure knowledge;Habit;Unconscious behavior;Safety;
 Language
Korean
 Cited by
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